Original Research

Rapid survey to determine the predictive factors of vaccination coverage in children aged 0 to 59 months in Guinea

Abdoulaye Touré, Ibrahima Camara, Alioune Camara, Mariama Sylla, Mamadou S. Sow, Alpha K. Keita
Southern African Journal of Infectious Diseases | Vol 36, No 1 | a261 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajid.v36i1.261 | © 2021 Abdoulaye Touré, Ibrahima Camara, Alioune Camara, Mariama Sylla, Mamadou S. Sow, Alpha K. Keita | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 03 November 2020 | Published: 26 August 2021

About the author(s)

Abdoulaye Touré, Chaire de Sante Publique, Département des Sciences Pharmaceutiques, Université Gamal Abdel Nasser, Conakry, Guinea; and, Centre de Recherche et de Formation en Infectiologie de Guinée (CERFIG), Université Gamal Abdel Nasser, Conakry, Guinea; and, Institut National de Santé Publique (INSP), Ministère de la Santé, Conakry, Guinea
Ibrahima Camara, Centre de Recherche et de Formation en Infectiologie de Guinée (CERFIG), Université Gamal Abdel Nasser, Conakry, Guinea
Alioune Camara, Chaire de Sante Publique, Département de Sciences Médicales, Université Gamal Abdel Nasser, Conakry, Guinea
Mariama Sylla, Chaire de Sante Publique, Département des Sciences Pharmaceutiques, Université Gamal Abdel Nasser, Conakry, Guinea; and, Centre de Recherche et de Formation en Infectiologie de Guinée (CERFIG), Université Gamal Abdel Nasser, Conakry, Guinea
Mamadou S. Sow, Centre de Recherche et de Formation en Infectiologie de Guinée (CERFIG), Université Gamal Abdel Nasser, Conakry, Guinea; and, Service de Maladies infectieuses et Tropicales, Hôpital National Donka, Conakry, Guinea
Alpha K. Keita, Centre de Recherche et de Formation en Infectiologie de Guinée (CERFIG), Université Gamal Abdel Nasser, Conakry, Guinea; and, Institut National de Santé Publique (INSP), Ministère de la Santé, Conakry, Guinea; and, TransVIHMI, Université de Montpellier/IRD/INSERM, Montpellier, France


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Abstract

Background: The Expanded Program on Immunisation has made it possible to prevent more than 3 million deaths in children under 5 years. The objectives of this study were to estimate the vaccination coverage of children from 0 to 59 months and identify factors associated with incomplete vaccination coverage.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out in a dispensary in Conakry, Guinea between January and February 2020. Sociodemographic and vaccination information was collected from mothers of 380 randomly select children aged 0 to 59 months. Information on immunisation coverage was gathered from records vaccination cards and maternal reports. Logistic regression was used to identify factors independently associated with incomplete immunisation coverage.

Results: Most (66.5%) children aged < 12 months were up-to-date with their vaccinations. Factors associated with incomplete vaccination in this age group included: unavailability of vaccination cards (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 7.58; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.56–22.44) and lack of prenatal consultation attendance (aOR 2.93; 95% CI: 1.15–7.48). In contrast only 19.8% (95% CI: 13.9–26.7) of children aged 12–59 months were fully immunised. Factors associated with incomplete vaccination coverage in children aged 12–59 months included high birth order (aOR 10.23; 95% CI: 2.06–19.43), and lack of prenatal consultation attendance (aOR 5.34; 95% CI: 1.48–19.23).

Conclusion: Child immunisation coverage is low in Guinea. These results highlight the need to develop strategies based on an integrated approach to overcome obstacles to childhood immunisation in Guinea.


Keywords

survey; vaccination; children; pre-COVID-19; Guinea

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