Review Article

Maternal vaccination: A narrative review

Sahra Ashkir, Olive P. Khaliq, Mehreen Hunter, Jagidesa Moodley
Southern African Journal of Infectious Diseases | Vol 37, No 1 | a451 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajid.v37i1.451 | © 2022 Sahra Ashkir, Olive P. Khaliq, Mehreen Hunter, Jagidesa Moodley | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 27 May 2022 | Published: 26 September 2022

About the author(s)

Sahra Ashkir, Women’s Health and HIV, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Clinical Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
Olive P. Khaliq, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Clinical Medicine, The University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Mehreen Hunter, Division of Public Health Medicine, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
Jagidesa Moodley, Women’s Health and HIV, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Clinical Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa

Abstract

Background: Vaccinations in general are considered to be one of the greatest achievements in medicine, saving millions of lives globally.

Aim: This narrative review highlights issues related to vaccination in pregnancy and provides information on those vaccines registered for use in pregnancy.

Method: Published articles on vaccinations in pregnancy are included in this review. The search engines used included PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, and ScienceDirect.

Results: Vaccinations during pregnancy are more likely to be administered in high income countries (HICs) compared to low-income countries (LICs) due to easier access to healthcare services and better communicable disease awareness. Maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality rates associated with infectious diseases are higher in LICs with access to maternal care services, infrastructure and hospital equipment lacking in these settings.

Conclusion: Suitable vaccinations are recommended for use in pregnancy to prevent harm to women, their foetuses and newborns from some communicable diseases, and they have resulted in declines in maternal and infant morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, this review has shown that vaccination during pregnancy is not only safe for both the woman and her foetus but also effective. Therefore, health professionals and national governments should strongly consider approved vaccinations prior to or during pregnancy.

Contribution: This review provides insight on the necessity of vaccination during pregnancy. In addition, it urges health professionals to inform patients of the importance of regular antenatal visits, and to receive the required vaccinations for a better health outcome.

 


Keywords

vaccinations; immunisation; pregnancy; foetus; neonates

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Crossref Citations

1. Modern Approaches in Immunoprophylaxis of Infectious Diseases During Pregnancy
Leyla S. Namazova-Baranova, Marina V. Fedoseenko, Liliya R. Selimzyanova, Tatiana A. Kaliuzhnaia, Firuza Ch. Shakhtakhtinskaya, Svetlana V. Tolstova, Arevaluis M. Selvyan
Pediatric pharmacology  vol: 19  issue: 5  first page: 417  year: 2023  
doi: 10.15690/pf.v19i5.2487