Case Report

Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever presenting with undiagnosed chronic myeloid leukaemia†

Marius J. Coetzee, Lucille H. Blumberg, Janusz T. Paweska, Pat Leman, Robert Swanepoel, André de Kock
Southern African Journal of Infectious Diseases | Vol 32, No 4 | a41 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajid.v32i4.41 | © 2019 Marius J. Coetzee, Lucille H. Blumberg, Janusz T. Paweska, Pat Leman, Robert Swanepoel, André de Kock | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 14 May 2019 | Published: 31 December 2017

About the author(s)

Marius J. Coetzee, Department of Haematology and Cell Biology, University of the Free State and National Health Laboratory Service, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Lucille H. Blumberg, Centre for Emerging and Zoonotic Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa
Janusz T. Paweska, Special Pathogens Unit, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa
Pat Leman, Special Pathogens Unit, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa
Robert Swanepoel, Special Pathogens Unit, National Institute for Communicable Diseases of the National Health Laboratory Service, Johannesburg, South Africa; Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa
André de Kock, Department of Haematology and Cell Biology, University of the Free State and National Health Laboratory Service, Bloemfontein, South Africa

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Abstract

A patient with Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF) presented with a high white cell count and splenomegaly. Underlying chronic myeloid leukaemia was diagnosed. The management of this complex case was difficult, and the patient demised. This case illustrates that in patients with an acute febrile illness with haemorrhage, a thorough history and examination, as well as a high index of suspicion for concurrent conditions, is important.

Keywords

chronic myeloid leukaemia; Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus; leucocytosis; South Africa; tick-borne diseases

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