Original Research

Knowledge, attitudes and practices of doctors regarding isoniazid preventive therapy in HIV/AIDS patients at Odi District Hospital, Gauteng province, South Africa

A. T. Abdulrazaak, I. Govender, D. Nzaumvila
Southern African Journal of Infectious Diseases | Vol 33, No 5 | a151 | | © 2019 A. T. Abdulrazaak, I. Govender, D. Nzaumvila | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 31 May 2019 | Published: 05 December 2018

About the author(s)

A. T. Abdulrazaak, Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa
I. Govender, Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa
D. Nzaumvila, Department of Family Medicine and Primary Health Care, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, Pretoria, Gauteng, South Africa

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Abstract

Introduction: Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) can reduce the overall risk of active tuberculosis (TB) in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) by up to 62%. As a result the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) have recommended IPT provision as a global strategy to reduce the prevalence of TB for PLHIV. However, whilst there are 84 countries supporting the provision of IPT in their policies, less than 1% of PLHIV in those countries are currently receiving IPT. Approximately 65% of TB patients in South Africa are HIV co-infected. Despite this fact, doctors are hesitant to prescribe IPT to TB-negative HIV-infected patients. Many doctors are also unaware of the current IPT guidelines of South Africa. This study sought to determine the level of knowledge, attitudes and practices of doctors regarding IPT for patients infected with HIV at Odi Hospital in Gauteng.
Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was undertaken with a standardised questionnaire administered to 51 doctors working at Odi Hospital.
Results: There were 51 respondents, many doctors (43.1%) having an excellent knowledge of IPT. Although one-third of the doctors were dispassionate about IPT provision, the majority of respondents (54.9%) had positive attitudes towards IPT provision. On average the doctors had good practices regarding IPT provision (35.3%). There were 12 (23.5%) doctors who were trained for IPT implementation. Although training was not associated with doctors’ knowledge or attitudes towards IPT, it was associated with the practice of IPT implementation.
Conclusion: Irrespective of their position, doctors at Odi District Hospital need formal training on the implementation of IPT, as this increases their confidence in IPT and their implementation practices.


Keywords

district hospital; HIV/AIDS; isoniazid preventive therapy; tuberculosis

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