Original Research

The use of aged stool specimens for the detection of rotavirus

Karen de Bruyn, Elizabeth M.C. Theron, John B. Dewar, Richard M. Hendrick
Southern African Journal of Infectious Diseases | Vol 35, No 1 | a113 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajid.v35i1.113 | © 2020 Karin de Bruyn, Elizabeth M.C. Theron, John B. Dewar, Richard M. Hendrick | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 28 May 2019 | Published: 09 March 2020

About the author(s)

Karen de Bruyn, College of Agriculture and Environmental Science Laboratories, College of Agriculture and Environmental Science, University of South Africa, Roodepoort, South Africa
Elizabeth M.C. Theron, College of Agriculture and Environmental Science Laboratories, College of Agriculture and Environmental Science, University of South Africa, Roodepoort, South Africa
John B. Dewar, Department of Life and Consumer Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Science, University of South Africa, Roodepoort, South Africa
Richard M. Hendrick, Department of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Science, University of South Africa, Roodepoort, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: Rotavirus is considered worldwide as one of the most important viral gastrointestinal infections, resulting in potentially life-threatening diarrhoea and death in children under the age of 5 years. Rotavirus can survive and remain infectious for long periods outside of the human body and can be easily transmitted via environmental surfaces.

Method: Stool specimens that had been collected and stored since 2010/2011 at 2°C – 8°C instead of −20°C or −80°C were analysed to determine the viability of rotavirus in these specimens after 6 years of improper storage. The specimens were analysed using simple enzyme immunoassay (EIA) methods from two different suppliers at different times throughout the period (2012–2017).

Results: The analysis showed similar detection results for the two EIA kits.

Conclusion: The rotavirus can be detected after several years of incorrect storage with EIA kits.


Keywords

diarrhoea; enzyme immunoassays; rotavirus; specimen storage; specimen viability.

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