Original Research

Interleukin-10 and tumour necrosis factor alpha promoter region polymorphisms and susceptibility to urogenital schistosomiasis in young Zimbabwean children living in Schistosoma haematobium endemic regions

Amos Marume, Arthur Vengesai, Jaclyn Mann, Takafira Mduluza
Southern African Journal of Infectious Diseases | Vol 35, No 1 | a11 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajid.v35i1.11 | © 2020 Amos Marume, Arthur Vengesai, Jaclyn Mann, Takafira Mduluza | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 08 May 2019 | Published: 03 September 2020

About the author(s)

Amos Marume, Department of Infection Prevention and Control, School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa; and Paraclinical Department, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences, University of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe
Arthur Vengesai, Department of Infection Prevention and Control, School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa; and Department of Biochemistry, University of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe
Jaclyn Mann, Department of Infection Prevention and Control, School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa
Takafira Mduluza, Department of Infection Prevention and Control, School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa; and Department of Biochemistry, University of Zimbabwe, Harare, Zimbabwe

Abstract

Background: Host genetic factors can influence susceptibility, morbidity and mortality from schistosomiasis. The study explored the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) promoter regions and susceptibility to Schistosoma haematobium infection.

Methods: Urine specimens were collected from 361 primary school children aged 5–15 years from schistosomiasis endemic areas of Manicaland and Mashonaland central provinces. Schistosoma haematobium was diagnosed using the urine filtration method. Only 272 participants provided adequate blood for genotyping. Genotyping was performed using the amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction. The association between IL-10 and TNF-α SNPs and S. haematobium infection was analysed using the chi-square test.

Results: Schistosoma haematobium infection was confirmed in 26.8% of the participants. No significant difference in S. haematobium prevalence between men (51.6% of those infected) and women (48.4%) (χ2 = 0.008, df = 1, p = 0.928) was observed. The total IL-10 -1082 G, IL-10 -819 C and TNF-α -308G allele distribution between S. haematobium infected and uninfected participants was 50.7% and 51.5% (χ2 = 0.025, df = 1, p = 0.87), 54.3% and 60.6% (χ2 = 1.187, df = 1, p = 0.187) and 82.1% and 80.9% (χ2 = 0.099, df = 1, p = 0.753), respectively, and the differences were not significant.

Conclusion: Interleukin-10 -1082 G/A, IL-10 -819 C/T and TNF-α -308 G/A SNPs were not significantly associated with susceptibility to S. haematobium infection. The prevalence of schistosomiasis is still in the moderate range and is similar in boys and girls.


Keywords

cytokine polymorphisms; associations; S. haematobium; IL-10; TNF-α.

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