Case Report

Black widow spider bite in Johannesburg

Teressa S. Thomas, Alan Kemp, Kim P. Roberg
Southern African Journal of Infectious Diseases | Vol 33, No 3 | a13 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajid.v33i3.13 | © 2019 Teressa S. Thomas, Alan Kemp, Kim P. Roberg | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 09 May 2019 | Published: 30 September 2018

About the author(s)

Teressa S. Thomas, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Alan Kemp, Centre for Emerging, Zoonotic and Parasitic Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Diseases, Sandringham, South Africa
Kim P. Roberg, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa; Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa

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Abstract

Black widow spider bites are uncommon in South Africa, but it is important for clinicians to be aware of the clinical presentation in order to initiate appropriate treatment. This case highlights the presentation and management of a middle-aged gentleman who presented to the Chris Hani Baragwanath hospital following a spider bite. The bite was later confirmed to be that of a black widow spider. The patient presented with the typical symptoms of latrodectism – autonomic dysfunction, muscle rigidity and cramps – and was managed symptomatically with a favourable outcome.


Keywords

black widow spider; latrodectism; spider bite

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Crossref Citations

1. Quadriplegia as a Rare Complication of Black Widow Spider Envenomation
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doi: 10.5812/hmj.106714