Original Research

Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae colonisation in adult inpatients: A point prevalence study

Pieter Nel, Lauren A. Paterson, Rena Hoffmann
Southern African Journal of Infectious Diseases | Vol 34, No 1 | a129 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajid.v34i1.129 | © 2019 Pieter Nel, Lauren A. Roberts, Rena Hoffmann | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 29 May 2019 | Published: 22 November 2019

About the author(s)

Pieter Nel, Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, Tygerberg Medical Campus, University of Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa; and Medical Microbiology Laboratory, Tygerberg Hospital, National Health Laboratory Service, Cape Town, South Africa
Lauren A. Paterson, Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, Tygerberg Medical Campus, University of Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa
Rena Hoffmann, Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Pathology, Tygerberg Medical Campus, University of Stellenbosch, Cape Town, South Africa; and Medical Microbiology Laboratory, Tygerberg Hospital, National Health Laboratory Service, Cape Town, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: Infections caused by carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) have been increasing worldwide in recent years, but data regarding the prevalence and clinical significance of CPE colonisation in South Africa is not well documented. Local private hospital groups have implemented routine screening programmes for selected high-risk patients as endorsed by the South African Society for Clinical Microbiology. This practice is not routinely performed in the public sector.

Methods: A point prevalence study was performed at Tygerberg Hospital (TBH) by screening patients of all the adult inpatient wards to investigate the current prevalence of CPE colonisation. Common risk factors associated with CPE colonisation were also investigated.

Results: From a total of 439 patient samples collected, only one patient was colonised with a Klebsiella pneumoniae organism harbouring blaNDM-1. The identified patient had none of the common risk factors associated with CPE colonisation.

Conclusion: Based on these findings, screening for CPE colonisation in adults on admission to TBH is currently not recommended.


Keywords

Point prevalence; colonisation; carbapenem resistance, carbapenemase; Enterobacteriaceae; blaNDM-1.

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